Low Price Guarantee
We Take School POs
All of our bargain books are brand new, perfectly readable and represent a tremendous value! The bargain books are, however, publisher overstocks and remainders that TRW purchases at deep discounts. As a result, they may have a small mark through the UPC bar code or a small mark on the side of the book. This is simply to mark the books so they cannot be sent back to a publisher. Because of this, bargain books are non returnable to TRW unless they are damaged. Please consider this before ordering.
PLEASE NOTE:
Bargain Books are not eligible for Library Processing
Astronomy: Out of This World!
ISBN: 9780753462904
Author: Green, Dan
Publisher: Kingfisher
Published: May 2009
Retail: $8.99    OUR PRICE: $1.99
     You Save 78%
Binding Type: Paperback
Qty:
Annotation: Like a Facebook for the universe, "Astronomy" gives every important celestial body and concept its own page, where readers can learn its behaviors, likes, and dislikes up close and personal. From the flashy stars to the shadowy and strange objects that hang out like loners at the edges of the universe, no player goes unnoticed. Every profile has a hip anime-style portrait to round out the picture, but make no mistake: while the presentation is all style, the science is rock solid. The book includes a super cute poster of the solar system in the back. The universe has never been so cool.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Nonfiction | Science & Nature - Astronomy
Dewey: 520
Lexile Measure: 1130
Series: Basher
BISAC category: JUVENILE NONFICTION / Science & Nature / Astronomy
Target Grade/Age Group: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Grade level: Grade 4-6
Physical Information: 128 pages
Lexile Level: 1130
Bargain Category: Upper Elementary, Science, Reference, Middle School
Grade level(s): 4th, 5th, 6th
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
Like a Facebook for the universe, "Astronomy" gives every important celestial body and concept its own page, where readers can learn its behaviors, likes, and dislikes up close and personal. From the flashy stars to the shadowy and strange objects that hang out like loners at the edges of the universe, no player goes unnoticed. Every profile has a hip anime-style portrait to round out the picture, but make no mistake: while the presentation is all style, the science is rock solid. The book includes a super cute poster of the solar system in the back. The universe has never been so cool.

Contributor Bio(s): Green, Dan: - Dan Green is a freelance science writer and editor who consulted on Basher's previous book for Kingfisher, The Periodic Table.Basher, Simon: - Artist and designer Simon Basher has fun playing in the world of contemporary character design. Inspired by a love of simple line work and a rich color palette, his characters fill the gap between edgy manga and the cuteness of Hello Kitty. He lives in England.Green, Dan: - Dan Green is a freelance science writer and editor who consulted on Basher's previous book for Kingfisher, The Periodic Table.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2009 August)

Gr 4–8—Employing the same illustrative style used in Adrian Dingle's The Periodic Table: Elements with Style! (Kingfisher, 2007), Basher has created a portrait gallery of personified planets, comets, space probes, galaxies, several kinds of stars, and an array of other celestial bodies in a hyper-cute, pastel cartoon style reminiscent of Japanese artist Takashi Murakami's more extravagant flights. Along with short bulleted lists of additional information, each figure offers a fact-based self-description, from the Sun's exuberant "I'm a total star—the center of everything, baby! A fearsome fireball burning 600 million tons of hydrogen every second" to snotty Space-time's "Because you're used to seeing in only three dimensions, you cannot even imagine what I look like." Though the closest star to the sun is misidentified as a "brown dwarf" (it is actually Proxima Centauri, a red dwarf, which is correctly categorized on a later page), Green's astro-narrative is both accurate and spiced with seldom-mentioned details, such as Pluto's three moons and Saturn's weirdly hexagonal polar cloud. This won't replace more conventionally written and illustrated surveys, but it could kindle (or in undermotivated older readers, rekindle) interest in the topic. And it's fun!—John Peters, New York Public Library

[Page 122]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.