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Clever Beatrice
ISBN: 9780689832543
Author: Willey, Margaret/ Solomon, Heather (ILT)
Publisher: Atheneum
Published: September 2001
Retail: $17.99    OUR PRICE: $2.99
     You Save 83%
Binding Type: Library Binding
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Annotation: When Beatrice's family is down to their last bit of food, she marches through the woods to the giant's home hoping to win some of his gold. The giant heartily agrees to a contest, and time after time Beatrice proves that brains beat brawn hands down. Full color.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Fairy Tales & Folklore
Library of Congress Subjects:
Folklore; Michigan.
Tall tales.
Dewey: 398.2
LCCN: 00042019
Lexile Measure: 470
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 1-2, Age 6-7
Book type: Easy Fiction
Target Grade: 1-2
Grade level: 1-2
Physical Information: 0.50" H x 50.00" L x 11.00" W
Bargain Category: Early Elementary, Myths & Legends, Picture Books
Grade level(s): PreK, Kindergarten, 1st, 2nd, 3rd
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
"Good afternoon, Mister Giant, Sir. I have come to make a bet with you."

Can a very little girl beat a very large giant in feats of strength? That's what clever Beatrice bets on when she marches through the north woods to the home of the giant, hoping to win some of his gold to help her mother buy porridge. The giant heartily agrees to a contest, never imagining the wisp of a girl could out-muscle him. But what he hasn't counted on is how clever Beatrice is...and that brains beat brawn every time.

This tall tale from Michigan's upper peninsula is told in delicious dialect, and introduces a heroine who's as irrepressible as Eloise.


Contributor Bio(s): Margaret Willey is a Michigan resident herself. She is also the author of many books for children, including, most recently, Thanksgiving With Me, illustrated by Lloyd Bloom, and the novels The Bigger Book of Lydia, an ALA Best Book, and Finding David Dolores.
Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Spring)
Set in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, this is a winning tale of brain vs. brawn from the French-Canadian tradition, full of lively dialogue and situation. Young Beatrice, small but smart, ventures off into the far north woods to gamble with a rich but rather dim giant. Beatrice wins the contest, then two more, and brings home a sack of gold to her impoverished mother. The remarkable illustrations have unusual texture and depth. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2001 #6)
Set in Michigan's Upper Peninsula, this is a winning tale of brain vs. brawn from the French-Canadian tradition, full of lively dialogue and situation. Young Beatrice, small but smart, ventures off into the far north woods to earn her fortune-specifically, to gamble with a rich but rather dim giant. Beatrice challenges "Mister Giant, Sir," to a contest. "Beatrice looked at the giant's cabin and pointed to his front door, a door as big as a boat, made of long planks of pine. 'Let us strike against your front door, we two. The hardest blow will win the bet.' 'Oh, you are making a big mistake, you,' the giant chuckled. He walked over to his front door, swung his arm back, and then let his fist fly hard against the wood-ker-blam! The walls trembled, the windows rattled, the door groaned on its brass hinges. The giant turned and grinned at Beatrice, showing all his teeth. 'Your turn,' he said." Thanks to her brains and the giant's lack of same, Beatrice wins the contest, then two more proposed by the disgruntled giant, and brings home a sack of gold coins to her impoverished mother. The three contests fit seamlessly into the U.P. setting, involving lumberjacks, huge felled trees, wells, and the fishing and mining native to the area. Willey's telling is simple but spirited, and her dialogue, with its slight French-Canadian cadence, is pitch perfect. Heather Solomon's illustrations are remarkable: watercolors augmented with collage, they have unusual texture and depth. The giant, in his blaze-orange vest, is given bulk and a daunting presence, but the dazed expression on his face tells us he will be no match for little Beatrice, even more vivid in her bright crimson dress. Copyright 2001 Horn Book Magazine Reviews
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2001 July #5)
First-time illustrator Solomon makes an impressive debut in this winning tale of a spunky girl who matches her wits against a giant's brawn to save her family from destitution. Combining detailed watercolor and collage, the artist works patches of photographed tree bark, flowers, earth and grass into her paintings, creating a world in which realism blends with fantasy images to magical effect. Slender logs frame some of the pictures; in others, Beatrice and the giant appear as silhouettes against a white background. While some readers may find the heroine's cheekiness off-putting, others will admire her confidence and creative problem-solving as she tricks the giant into conceding each bet, in spite of his superior strength. Such humorous moments as when the girl wraps a rope around the giant's well and says, "I am not going to bother carrying those buckets one by one.... I would sooner pull out the whole well," are sure to amuse readers, as will the good-natured tone of the battle, which leaves the giant "smiling to himself, feeling lucky" despite his losses. Willey's engaging tale of her sharp-witted heroine's courage, enhanced by Solomon's inspired illustrations, is clever indeed. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2004 August #2)
"A winning tale of a spunky girl who matches her wits against a giant's brawn to save her family from destitution," wrote PW in a starred review. Ages 4-8. (Sept.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2001 October)
K-Gr 3-This tall tale from the north woods of Michigan recounts the exploits of a sassy and spirited but very poor little girl named Beatrice. She greets readers on the first page clad in a red dress and literally walks out of the illustration's frame in a way that indicates that she is clearly a heroine with whom to be reckoned. When the child asks her mother how she could earn money to improve their meager existence, her mother tells her about "A rich giant who loves to gamble on his own strength." Beatrice, to her mother's surprise, departs the next day in search of the well-heeled giant and, true to character, she brashly bets him 10 coins that she can "strike a blow harder than you." The none-too-bright man naturally laughs at the challenge by this wee girl, but agrees. After being outwitted in feats of strength no less than three times, the giant relinquishes the last of the treasure to the wily youngster whereupon Beatrice runs home, eager for her mother's warm embrace and heartfelt praise. Solomon does a commendable job of depicting the rough-hewn environs of Michigan's Upper Peninsula in evocative earth tones. Beatrice's character is particularly well rendered with her elfish yet beguiling visage. This tale is especially empowering to girls without being overtly feminist or didactic and will succeed with children because its foundation is fine storytelling.-Rosalyn Pierini, San Luis Obispo City-County Library, CA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.