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We Rode the Orphan Trains
ISBN: 9780618432356
Author: Warren, Andrea
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Published: March 2004
Retail: $9.95    OUR PRICE: $1.99
     You Save 80%
Binding Type: Paperback
Qty:
Annotation: They were "throwaway" kids, living on the streets or in orphanages and foster homes. Then Charles Loring Brace, a young minister in New York City, started the Children's Aid Society and devised a plan to give these homeless waifs a chance at finding families they could call their own. Thus began an extraordinary migration of American children. Between 1854 and 1929, an estimated 200,000 children ventured forth on a journey of hope. Here, in the sequel to Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story, Andrea Warren introduces nine men and women who rode the trains and helped make history so many years ago.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Nonfiction | Family | Orphans & Foster Homes
- Juvenile Nonfiction | History | United States
Library of Congress Subjects:
Orphan trains; Juvenile literature.
Orphans; United States; Biography; Juvenile literature.
Orphan trains.
Dewey: 362.73/4/0973
LCCN: 00047279
Lexile Measure: 940
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Book type: Juvenile Non-Fiction
BISAC category: JUVENILE NONFICTION / Family / Orphans & Foster Homes
Target Age Group: Age 9-11
Target Grade: Grade 4-6
Grade level: Grade 4-6
Physical Information: 0.50" H x 50.00" L x 7.25" W
Lexile Level: 940
Bargain Category: Upper Elementary, Social Issues, Reference, Middle School, History, Growing Up
Grade level(s): 5th, 6th, 7th
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 56743
Reading Level: 6.4   Interest Level: Middle Grades   Point Value: 4.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q28139
Reading Level: 5.7   Interest Level: Grades 3-5   Point Value: 7.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
They were "throwaway" kids, living on the streets or in orphanages and foster homes. Then Charles Loring Brace, a young minister in New York City, started the Children's Aid Society and devised a plan to give these homeless waifs a chance at finding families they could call their own. Thus began an extraordinary migration of American children. Between 1854 and 1929, an estimated 200,000 children ventured forth on a journey of hope. Here, in the sequel to Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story, Andrea Warren introduces nine men and women who rode the trains and helped make history so many years ago.

Contributor Bio(s):
Andrea Warren's books about children are the result of her passion for history and her interest in young readers. She has been a professional writer for twenty years and works from her home office in the Kansas City area. Her first book for Houghton Mifflin, Orphan Train Rider, won the 1996 Boston Globe - Horn Book Award for nonfiction.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2002 Spring)
Introductory chapters explain how the orphan train program was begun in the 1850s by Charles Loring Brace and describe the role of agent Clara Comstock in accompanying orphans from New York to their new homes in the Midwest. The experiences of individual riders are described in the anecdotal, often touching text and accompanied by appealing black-and-white photographs. Bib., ind. Copyright 2002 Horn Book Guide Reviews
Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2001 #6)
Warren's Boston Globe Horn Book Award winner, Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story, focused on the experiences of a single child. Here Warren tells the stories of several children who rode the orphan trains in the early part of the twentieth century. Introductory chapters explain the program's founding in the early 1850s by Charles Loring Brace and describe the work of the agents who accompanied orphans on the trains from New York to their new homes in the Midwest. Among the children profiled in the anecdotal, often touching text are twin sisters Nettie and Nellie Crook, who flourished under the care of an older couple in Kansas; Art Smith, who was abandoned in a New York department store as an infant and taken in by an Iowa family; and Betty Murray, who was adopted by a prosperous couple while her siblings were raised nearby in somewhat harsher circumstances. While some of the orphans were forced into labor or suffered abuse, those interviewed for this volume-and featured in appealing black-and-white pictures as both children and older adults-grew up in generally pleasant circumstances and went on to rewarding adult lives. Many have become involved in the Orphan Train Heritage Society of America, staging reunions with other former riders and working to educate the public about this intriguing chapter in American history. Includes a brief bibliography and index. Copyright 2001 Horn Book Magazine Reviews
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2004 April #1)
Interviews of eight orphan train riders reveal their childhood experiences when they were part of the "placing out" program run by the Children's Aid Society of New York City between 1854 and 1929. "The anecdotes about these brave and lonely children will keep readers traveling on this train," wrote PW. Ages 8-12. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2001 October #1)
Warren (Orphan Train Rider) here interviews eight orphan train riders concerning their childhood experiences during "the largest children's migration in history" between 1854 and 1929 as part of a "placing out" program run by the Children's Aid Society of New York City. The stories reflect the diversity of the train itself, from Nettie, who discusses how she and her identical twin, Nellie, escaped their first sadistic adoptive mother to find a loving home with an older couple, to Art Smith, whose daydreams of an actress mother were shattered when he discovered he was a baby "left in a basket in Gimbel's Department Store." Many of the profiles include well-chosen details that will tug at readers' heartstrings, such as Sister Justina, who celebrated the wrong birth date for 57 years, or little Ruth, who initially refused to take her arms off the dinner table after years of protecting her food from grabby, hungry orphans. Black-and-white photographs effectively highlight the stories. Though some of the accounts focus too much on adult discoveries, ultimately the anecdotes about these brave and lonely children will keep readers traveling on this train. Ages 9-12. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2001 November)
Gr 4-8-Warren's story of nine-year-old Lee Nailling in Orphan Train Rider (Houghton, 1996) opened a window onto a disturbing period of American history in which children were both victims and heroes. In this follow-up volume, she relates the personal histories of eight men and women-now senior citizens-who were orphaned or abandoned as children and later traveled across the country in trains to meet strangers who would become their new family members. An introductory chapter describes the appalling numbers of homeless children in 19th-century America's large eastern cities and explains how poverty and disease as well as high rates of alcohol and drug addiction contributed to a problem that continued into the 20th century. The personal histories, based on interviews that Warren conducted with her subjects, are rich and compelling and so full of dramatic twists and turns that they could have been conceived by Charles Dickens. Hunger, fear, and isolation are the most common recollections of the men and women who speak from these pages. Fortunately these stories all have happy endings, testimony to the resilience of children and the kindness of strangers. The author also includes information about early social activists such as Charles Loring Brace, who established New York City's Children's Aid Society in 1853. These remarkable stories have enormous human-interest appeal and will provoke serious discussion about just how much life has really changed for children from the last century until today.-William McLoughlin, Brookside School, Worthington, OH Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.