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The Rape of the Lock and Other Major Writings 1 Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Pope, Alexander (Author), Damrosch, Leo (Editor)

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ISBN: 1451733321     ISBN-13: 9781451733327
Publisher: Follettbound
OUR PRICE: $27.90  

Binding Type: Prebind - See All Available Formats & Editions
Published: October 2011
* Not available - Not in print at this time *
Annotation: A new collection includes early poems, excerpts from Pope's translation of the "Iliad," selected prose works, and letters to such contemporaries as John Gay and Jonathan Swift.

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Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Poetry | English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
- Literary Collections | English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Dewey: 821/.5
LCCN: bl2011028982
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Series: Penguin Classics
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 1.25000" H x 5.25000" W x 8.00000" (.92000 lbs) 488 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): Alexander Pope was born in 1688 in London, England. His father, a linen merchant, moved his family to Binfield in Windsor Forest after the Glorious Revolution of 1688, where Pope received little schooling, educating himself largely through reading. At the age of twelve, Pope contracted a tubercular infection, never growing taller than four feet, six inches, and suffered from curvature of the spine and constant headaches. He came to public notice on the publication of “Pastorals” in Jacob Tonson’sMiscellany (1709), Essay on Criticism (1711), and gained much notoriety and acclaim forThe Rape of the Lock (1712). By 1713, Pope had befriended Jonathan Swift, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Dr. John Arbuthnot, and together they formed the “Scriblerus Club” which indirectly contributed to such works as Swift’sGulliver’s Travels and Pope’s own Dunciad (1728), as well as the Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus (1741). Pope’s translation of the Iliad (1715-1720) and theOdyssey (1725-1726) earned him financial success, as well as critical praise. Working jointly with Swift, they publishedMiscellanies (1727-1732), an obvious parody of writers, which was ill received. Pope answered again with a personal satire, the famousDunciad. He attempted a survey of human nature, completing Essay on Man (1733), andMortal Essays both reminiscent of the satire for which Pope had become so famous.Imitations of Horace (1733-1738) a parody of the contemporary social and political scene, and his “pirated” letters, which he had devised to be published, would be his last works. Pope died in 1744 and was buried in Twickenham Church. He left the epic verse Brutus incomplete.

Alexander Pope was born in 1688 in London, England. His father, a linen merchant, moved his family to Binfield in Windsor Forest after the Glorious Revolution of 1688, where Pope received little schooling, educating himself largely through reading. At the age of twelve, Pope contracted a tubercular infection, never growing taller than four feet, six inches, and suffered from curvature of the spine and constant headaches. He came to public notice on the publication of “Pastorals” in Jacob Tonson’s Miscellany (1709), Essay on Criticism (1711), and gained much notoriety and acclaim for The Rape of the Lock (1712). By 1713, Pope had befriended Jonathan Swift, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Dr. John Arbuthnot, and together they formed the “Scriblerus Club” which indirectly contributed to such works as Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels and Pope’s own Dunciad (1728), as well as the Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus (1741). Pope’s translation of the Iliad (1715-1720) and the Odyssey (1725-1726) earned him financial success, as well as critical praise. Working jointly with Swift, they published Miscellanies (1727-1732), an obvious parody of writers, which was ill received. Pope answered again with a personal satire, the famous Dunciad. He attempted a survey of human nature, completing Essay on Man (1733), and Mortal Essays both reminiscent of the satire for which Pope had become so famous. Imitations of Horace (1733-1738) a parody of the contemporary social and political scene, and his “pirated” letters, which he had devised to be published, would be his last works. Pope died in 1744 and was buried in Twickenham Church. He left the epic verse Brutus incomplete.

Alexander Pope was born in 1688 in London, England. His father, a linen merchant, moved his family to Binfield in Windsor Forest after the Glorious Revolution of 1688, where Pope received little schooling, educating himself largely through reading. At the age of twelve, Pope contracted a tubercular infection, never growing taller than four feet, six inches, and suffered from curvature of the spine and constant headaches. He came to public notice on the publication of “Pastorals” in Jacob Tonson’sMiscellany (1709), Essay on Criticism (1711), and gained much notoriety and acclaim forThe Rape of the Lock (1712). By 1713, Pope had befriended Jonathan Swift, John Gay, Thomas Parnell, and Dr. John Arbuthnot, and together they formed the “Scriblerus Club” which indirectly contributed to such works as Swift’sGulliver’s Travels and Pope’s own Dunciad (1728), as well as the Memoirs of Martinus Scriblerus (1741). Pope’s translation of the Iliad (1715-1720) and theOdyssey (1725-1726) earned him financial success, as well as critical praise. Working jointly with Swift, they publishedMiscellanies (1727-1732), an obvious parody of writers, which was ill received. Pope answered again with a personal satire, the famousDunciad. He attempted a survey of human nature, completing Essay on Man (1733), andMortal Essays both reminiscent of the satire for which Pope had become so famous.Imitations of Horace (1733-1738) a parody of the contemporary social and political scene, and his “pirated” letters, which he had devised to be published, would be his last works. Pope died in 1744 and was buried in Twickenham Church. He left the epic verse Brutus incomplete.
 
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