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The Curse of Bigness: Antitrust in the New Gilded Age
Contributor(s): Wu, Tim (Author)

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ISBN: 0999745468     ISBN-13: 9780999745465
Publisher: Columbia Global Reports
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Binding Type: Paperback - See All Available Formats & Editions
Published: November 2018
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Annotation: From the man who coined the term "net neutrality" and who has made significant contributions to our understanding of antitrust policy and wireless communications, comes a call for tighter antitrust enforcement and an end to corporate bigness.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- Business & Economics | Corporate Governance
- Business & Economics | Corporate & Business History - General
- Law | Antitrust
Dewey: 343.072
LCCN: 2018949786
Physical Information: 1" H x 5" W x 7.4" (0.40 lbs) 154 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): Wu, Tim: - Tim Wu is a policy advocate, a professor at Columbia Law School and a contributing opinion writer for The New York Times. He is best known for coining the phrase "net neutrality." He worked on competition policy in the Obama White House and the Federal Trade Commission, served as senior enforcement counsel at the New York Office of the Attorney General, and worked at the Supreme Court for Justice Stephen Breyer. His previous books are The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires and The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside our Heads.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2018 September #4)

In this short but persuasive book, Wu (The Attention Merchants), a Columbia law professor, connects the current political climate to a decline in antitrust enforcement. From the rise of U.S. Steel and Standard Oil through the "trust-busting" days of Teddy Roosevelt, Wu shows how antitrust laws, as championed by Louis Brandeis (who coined the term "the curse of bigness"), once functioned as a check on private power. In the modern era, however, enforcement has steadily declined; the George W. Bush administration did not bring a single antitrust action in eight years. The results, Wu argues, are a widening income gap and corporations subverting electoral politics. In the 20th century, he writes, "nations that failed to control private power and attend to the needs of their citizens faced the rise of strongmen who promised a more immediate deliverance from economic woes." The book's brevity is an asset—Wu skillfully avoids economic and legal rabbit holes, keeping the book laser-focused on his thesis: that antitrust enforcement must be restored "as a check on power as necessary in a functioning democracy before it's too late." Persuasive and brilliantly written, the book is especially timely given the rise of trillion-dollar tech companies. (Nov.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2018 September #4)

In this short but persuasive book, Wu (The Attention Merchants), a Columbia law professor, connects the current political climate to a decline in antitrust enforcement. From the rise of U.S. Steel and Standard Oil through the "trust-busting" days of Teddy Roosevelt, Wu shows how antitrust laws, as championed by Louis Brandeis (who coined the term "the curse of bigness"), once functioned as a check on private power. In the modern era, however, enforcement has steadily declined; the George W. Bush administration did not bring a single antitrust action in eight years. The results, Wu argues, are a widening income gap and corporations subverting electoral politics. In the 20th century, he writes, "nations that failed to control private power and attend to the needs of their citizens faced the rise of strongmen who promised a more immediate deliverance from economic woes." The book's brevity is an asset—Wu skillfully avoids economic and legal rabbit holes, keeping the book laser-focused on his thesis: that antitrust enforcement must be restored "as a check on power as necessary in a functioning democracy before it's too late." Persuasive and brilliantly written, the book is especially timely given the rise of trillion-dollar tech companies. (Nov.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2018 September #4)

In this short but persuasive book, Wu (The Attention Merchants), a Columbia law professor, connects the current political climate to a decline in antitrust enforcement. From the rise of U.S. Steel and Standard Oil through the "trust-busting" days of Teddy Roosevelt, Wu shows how antitrust laws, as championed by Louis Brandeis (who coined the term "the curse of bigness"), once functioned as a check on private power. In the modern era, however, enforcement has steadily declined; the George W. Bush administration did not bring a single antitrust action in eight years. The results, Wu argues, are a widening income gap and corporations subverting electoral politics. In the 20th century, he writes, "nations that failed to control private power and attend to the needs of their citizens faced the rise of strongmen who promised a more immediate deliverance from economic woes." The book's brevity is an asset—Wu skillfully avoids economic and legal rabbit holes, keeping the book laser-focused on his thesis: that antitrust enforcement must be restored "as a check on power as necessary in a functioning democracy before it's too late." Persuasive and brilliantly written, the book is especially timely given the rise of trillion-dollar tech companies. (Nov.)

Copyright 2018 Publishers Weekly.
 
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