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Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Grann, David

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ISBN: 0307742482     ISBN-13: 9780307742483
Publisher: Vintage Books
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Binding Type: Paperback
Published: April 2018
Qty:

Annotation: Presents a true account of the early 20th-century murders of dozens of wealthy Osage and law-enforcement officials, citing the contributions and missteps of a fledgling FBI that eventually uncovered one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. Reprint. A New York Times best-seller and National Book Award finalist.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Osage Indians; Crimes against; Case studies.
Murder; Oklahoma; Osage County; Case studies.
Homicide investigation; Oklahoma; Osage County; Case studies.
BISAC Categories:
- True Crime | Murder
- History | Native American
- History | United States | 20th Century
Dewey: 976.6004/975254
LCCN: 2017302459
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 8.00" H x 5.00" W x 0.75" (0.80 lbs) 377 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 190493
Reading Level: 8.8   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 14.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q70947
Reading Level: 11.6   Interest Level: Grades 9-12   Point Value: 19.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): David Grann is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, which was chosen as one of the best books of the year by The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications and has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. He is also the author of The Devil and Sherlock Holmes. His work has garnered several honors for outstanding journalism, including a George Polk Award.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2016 October #2)
New Yorker staff writer Grann (The Lost City of Z) burnishes his reputation as a brilliant storyteller in this gripping true-crime narrative, which revisits a baffling and frightening—and relatively unknown—spree of murders occurring mostly in Oklahoma during the 1920s. From 1921 to 1926, at least two dozen people were murdered by a killer or killers apparently targeting members of the Osage Indian Nation, who at the time were considered "the wealthiest people per capita in the world" thanks to the discovery of oil beneath their lands. The violent campaign of terror is believed to have begun with the 1921 disappearance of two Osage Indians, Charles Whitehorn and Anna Brown, and the discovery of their corpses soon afterwards, followed by many other murders in the next five years. The outcry over the killings led to the involvement in 1925 of an "obscure" branch of the Justice Department, J. Edgar Hoover's Bureau of Investigation, which eventually charged some surprising figures with the murders. Grann demonstrates how the Osage Murders inquiry helped Hoover to make the case for a "national, more professional, scientifically skilled" police force. Grann's own dogged detective work reveals another layer to the case that Hoover's men had never exposed. Agents: Kathy Robbins and David Halpern, Robbins Office. (Apr.) Copyright 2016 Publisher Weekly.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2017 August)

In 1920s Oklahoma, many members of the oil-wealthy Osage Nation were dying untimely and suspicious deaths. The widespread crimes against the Osage and the inability to identify those responsible led to the establishment of what is now known as the FBI. Grann, author of the best-selling The Lost City of Z, makes a complex web of violence and deception easy to follow by keeping the focus on one Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, whose family members were murdered one by one. This gripping title uncovers a baffling level of corruption. The author points his investigative lens at the perpetrators of the murders, reveals cover-ups by authorities all the way up to the national level, and illustrates that the deception continued almost a century later. There are plenty of curriculum connections: Native American and Osage tribal history, economics, law enforcement, and journalism. A varied selection of photographs help to set the scene for readers. End pages include comprehensive source notes, citations, and a bibliography. VERDICT This thoroughly researched, suspenseful exposé will appeal to followers of true crime programs such as the podcast Serial and the Netflix documentary series Making a Murderer, as well as to fans of Louise Erdrich's The Round House.—Tara Kehoe, formerly at New Jersey State Library Talking Book and Braille Center, Trenton

Copyright 2017 School Library Journal.
 
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