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Miss Spitfire
ISBN: 9781442408517
Author: Miller, Sarah
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
Published: August 2010
Retail: $7.99    OUR PRICE: $1.99
     You Save 76%
Binding Type: Paperback
Qty:
Annotation: Twenty-one-year-old, partially-blind but spirited Annie Sullivan tries to teach six-year-old Helen Keller, deaf and blind since age two, self-discipline and communication skills.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Blind; Fiction.
Deaf; Fiction.
People with disabilities; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: bl2010022793
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Target Grade: 7-9
Grade level: 7-9
Physical Information: 7.75" H x 5.00" L x 0.75" W
Bargain Category: Middle School, History, Biographies
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2007 July)

Gr 5–9— Filled with the tension, animosity, and determination that Annie Sullivan felt upon meeting Helen Keller, this novel portrays that most important month in their relationship, March 1887. The story is told through Annie's voice, and it begins as she travels by train from Boston to Tuscumbia, AL. The child she has been hired to teach is both deaf and blind, and there is only one previous case study that suggests that the six-year-old will ever be able to learn. As the story unfolds, readers see that strong-willed Annie is just the person to take on this formidable task. Her anger at Helen for her contrary ways is matched only by her disgust at the Kellers for allowing the girl to control everyone in the family and have her way. The incident during which Helen breaks a tooth in Annie's mouth with a well-placed punch is vividly recounted, and readers have great sympathy for the teacher's desire to get even. In spite of her own temper, the fierce love Annie feels, almost immediately, for Helen, is evident throughout. Although the flashbacks describing Annie's life before she arrived at the Kellers' interferes at times with the story's momentum, this excellent novel is compelling reading even for those familiar with the Keller/Sullivan experience. Children encountering them for the first time will feel an overwhelming sense of wonder and delight when Annie helps Helen make a communication breakthrough.—Wendy Smith-D'Arezzo, Loyola College, Baltimore, MD

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